Fred Ssewamala

Professor of Social Work and International Affairs; Director, Columbia University International Center for Child Health and Asset Development

PhD, Washington University in Saint Louis

CONTACT INFO
Room 1122
T: 212-851-2250
E: fs2114@columbia.edu

SUMMARY
Focus: Social and economic development policy, and child and adolescent health and development.

Research: Conducts rigorous interdisciplinary scientific research using randomized experimental designs to test the effects and cost of economic strengthening and social protection programs on children's and adolescents' health and developmental outcomes in limited-resource settings, such as sub-Saharan Africa.

DOWNLOAD CV (PDF: 26 pages)

Heidi Allen


BIO
Dr. Fred Ssewamala is Professor of Social Work and International Affairs at Columbia School of Social Work; the Founding Director of Columbia University International Center for Child Health and Asset Development; a Faculty Steering Committee Member with Columbia Global Centers, Africa; and a Global Thought Fellow with Columbia University.

Dr. Ssewamala’s research focuses on improving health and developmental outcomes for orphaned and vulnerable children and adolescents, and creates innovative social and financial inclusion programs for communities affected by poverty and disease. His current research is funded by a consortium of organizations, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Columbia University’s Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE), Columbia Population Research Center, the MasterCard Foundation, the Center for Social Development (CSD), and United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID).

In 2013, Dr. Ssewamala founded the International Center for Child Health and Asset Development (ICHAD) at Columbia University. The Center conducts rigorous interdisciplinary scientific research mainly using randomized experimental designs to evaluate how economic strengthening interventions and programs for poor, orphaned, and otherwise vulnerable children and their caregiving families in low-resource settings affect their: 1) overall financial inclusion and financial stability, 2) asset development and accumulation, 3) educational attainment, 4) psychosocial functioning, 5) risk-taking behavior, 6) nutrition, and 7) overall health and well-being. The Center tests and implements these interventions and programs in developing countries and in low-resource communities in the United States.